Heat Resistant Glass Sealant - 310ml for 058599144

Stock Number: ES914819

In Stock Available for immediate despatch

Rated 4.7 out of 5 (126 customer reviews)

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Will this part fit my appliance?

This product is compatible with:

  • Cookers & Hobs

Description

This quick curing silicone sealant is temperature resistant up to 300 degrees and can be used as a gasket seal in boilers, ovens, ducting, flue and heating applications. Perfect for sticking on an oven door seal.

  • Excellent adhesion to most non-porous surfaces
  • Sticks best to aluminium, ceramics and metals
  • Suitable for exterior and interior use
  • Fast cure - tack free in one hour
  • Permanent flexibility
  • 25 years life expectancy

Areas of use: For joints and assemblies which must be resistant to high temperatures in ducting, metal chimneys, industrial/domestic ovens, heating appliances.

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Product Reviews

Rated 4.7 out of 5 (126 customer reviews)
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  • High temp

    • 4.0 out of 5
    • 5.0 out of 5
    • 5.0 out of 5
    • 1.0 out of 5

    By - Bristol

    A footer bar in the oven door had come away from the glass. It was originally fixed with a high temp adhesive strip but I could not find this anywhere. (Oven is 14 years young) This sealant was recommended instead and has done the job OK. But it was too large a pack for what I needed and quite expensive at nearly £17. I will be wasting 97% of the product unless I can find another use for it. It would be nice if the manufacturer made a small squeezable tube pack.
  • What it says on the tin

    • 5.0 out of 5
    • 5.0 out of 5
    • 5.0 out of 5
    • 4.0 out of 5

    By - West Midlands

    This stuck my inner glass oven door perfectly. I just made sure to clean and even up the face of the rebate, as it had both softish and very hard remnants of previous sealer, then cleaned it and the glass edge with meths. If you can pipe cake icing neatly, you can apply this (needs a gun). It smoothed off easily with a bit of soapy cardboard. There seems to have been slight shrinkage when fully cured. And I should have followed the advice to use masking tape for a neater edge. It is about ten times as much as this job needed!
  • Pocket Saver

    • 5.0 out of 5
    • 5.0 out of 5
    • 5.0 out of 5
    • 5.0 out of 5

    By - Lancaster

    Not being clued up on anything kitchen wise I priced up a new cooker. After picking myself up I priced a new oven door picking myself up yet again I priced up the heat resistant Glass sealant I remained sitting just to be on the safe side but things were looking up I sent and paid for the product and it arrived after a very short wait. I had used sealants before so luckily I already had the gun to place the tube on. Worth noting if you don't have the gun buy that as well because it doesn't come included. I read the, good clear, instructions and cut the nozzle at what I judged to be the correct angle (it was Spot on first time) and started applying the sealant were I needed it. The whole job took about 10/15 minutes. I'm assuming that it was good quality as it may not of been the most expensive it was not the cheapest. Looking back at the imprint I had left on the kitchen floor (new cooker, new door) I can say without a shadow of doubt it was really great value

Ask & Answer

(19 Questions and 27 Answers) Ask a question
  • Q will this stick my hard plastic oven door handle to the glass door 2 Answers

    By rich6 - 29 September 2009

    • A
      If it was originally glued on and not screwed then this will do the job perfectly. You need to leave it a few hours (eg overnight) to set fully before use.

      By hemlock1961 - East Sussex - 13 February 2010

    • A
      In my opinion yes, but even if it doesn't it won't cost the earth to find out. I say give it a go! good luck.

      By femfixit - Essex - 11 November 2009

  • Q Best product for screws on door handle and chipboard surround? 2 Answers

    Our 10+ year old oven's plastic door handle has become detached, evidently because the metal screws holding it to the door's metal frame no longer engage with their holes in the plastic handle (the holes must have lost some thread). Some screws holding the oven frame in a chipboard surround are spinning in a similar way, although I don't think they affect functionality (it seems solid enough). I thought about repairing both with superglue, but read that PVA can produce cyanide gas at temperatures above 230C so this seems rather risky. As Heat Mate is OK to 300C, is it the best product to fix the various screws in place, or is some other adhesive/sealant better?

    By Ozaru - 01 September 2009

    • A
      Have you tried different bolts, either longer ones of the same size to use the thread further in the handle, or bigger ones and rethread the plastic of the handle. This stuff probably would do the job but it is a big cartridge and you would only need a small amount. The holes in the chipboard you could pack out with matchsticks (remove the heads obviously). Works as a sort of DIY rawlplug.

      By hemlock1961 - East Sussex - 13 February 2010

    • A
      Answering my own query after waiting in vain for anyone else to do so... and after hitting upon the revolutionary idea of calling the manufacturer (doh!)... Their technical services department were very helpful, and said (a) the sealant is not 'structural' so might pull straight out again if subjected to any significant load; (b) two-part epoxy resin adhesives (araldite etc.) are fine at high temperatures and stronger than sealants, so that's what I need. There were incidentally other problems I noticed from the docs on the EverBuild website and they confirmed, e.g. 'minimum width 6mm', 'do not use on soft metals such as brass', etc.

      By Ozaru - 15 September 2009

  • Q Should all the old silicone be removed from the door first, or can this go over the existing sealant? 2 Answers

    By Anonymous - Watford - 10 May 2009

    • A
      You need to scrape the old stuff off and clean off all grease with meths or similar.

      By hemlock1961 - East Sussex - 13 February 2010

    • A
      Hi Nigelashley, I'd advise removing as much old sealant as possible, as the new sealant will adhere much better to the surface of the oven.

      By Rory eSpares Staff - 22 July 2009

  • Q i have an internal glass oven door that has come off will it stick glass to metal? 2 Answers

    By mums - 26 February 2009

    • A
      This is what i have used it for and it has worked (so far!) Pretty easy to apply and oven was used the next day

      By leicesterpie - 25 May 2010

    • A
      Hi Mums, this sealant is made just for this purpose - it will re-stick your door glass just like that.

      By Rory eSpares Staff - 02 April 2009

  • Q the interior glass on door has come away would this be ok to seal with 2 Answers

    By waterlily - 16 January 2009

    • A
      yes it works, but is a bit messy, dont spill any

      By doedoe - liverpool - 20 January 2009

    • A
      Although the oven has only been used twice since applying the new adhesive it seems to have done the job. It was used to re-fix the inner oven glass (NEFF) which had come adrift after 10 years of regular usage. I'm hopeful that it will last at least another 10 years, when it will probably be time for a new one! Beware though, the sealant / adhesive can be very messy to apply if you haven't done it before. Need to spend time to ensure that the old surfaces are thoroughly cleaned up.

      By Ricardo - South Cumbria - 19 January 2009