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How to Replace the Motor on a Garden Vacuum - Flymo

If your garden vacuum is running intermittently you could have an issue with  a faulty motor - once this happens then many people may simply throw the appliance in the bin. This does not have to be the case.

A very simple repair this can be in no time and with minimal effort - you don’t require a degree in engineering to perform this repair, it could be done from anywhere in your home.

If you are very weary of the procedure follow this guide where we talk you through the process and once repaired you can rest easy knowing you’ve saved a ton of money.

This video shows an example on how to remove or replace the part on a typical machine, some models may be different but the procedure should be similar.

What You Will Need:

Step 1 - Safety Advice

Safety First! Please ensure that you have disconnected the appliance from the mains before starting any repair.

Step 2 - Stripping the Machine

To get to the motor we need to split the garden vacuum case but first we need to remove the collection bag, shredding line and the handle. To remove the handle, you’ll notice that there are endcaps holding them in place; these can be unscrewed and once taken off you can lift off the handle. Don’t forget to also lift the screw out - removing these may be a tad bit fiddly but the do come out.

Step 3 - Opening the Chassis

With these external parts removed you can now begin to split the chassis. The screws are deep-set so using a long philips screwdriver you can start removing the screws one by one.

With the last screw removed you can now separate the garden vacuum’s chassis - this will unveil the motor which is wired up, the spindle, fan impeller and cutting head.

Step 4 - The Motor

So the first thing I’m going to do is remove the wires from the original motor,it is important to wire-in the new motor in exactly the same way as the old motor is wired. Now I can just take the spade clips off the motor.

eSpares Top Tip:Take a photo of the wiring on the original motor - this will help you later when reconnecting the wires.

Step 5 - Dismantling the Old Motor

To remove the fan and head, you need to loosen them from the motor, to do this you need to take a flathead screwdriver and loosen the armature which can be found at the top of the motor. With your finger pressed onto the armature, you can now unscrew the fan and the cutting head until it comes off.

A thing to note when replacing the motor, make sure you keep the existing impeller fan and cutting head along with the washer as the new motor will not come supplied with these.

Step 6 - Fitting the Impeller

Replacing the motor is simple, first you need to refit the washer and put fit the impeller fan along with the cutting head, and holding down against the armature you can spin the fan and head untill they stop turning. Once they turn no more you need to retighten the the top of the motor with the flathead screwdriver.

Step 7 - The Reassembly

You can now fit the motor, make sure you refer to your photos to ensure you refit the wires back correctly. Once all connected you can reset the motor in place, once secured you can now put both parts of the garden vac together and using that long philips screwdriver you can start to close up the chassis.

Then one the chassis is secure refit the handle, not forgetting the screws and end caps and reattach the cutting line and collection bag and voila you have just stripped your garden vacuum, replaced a faulty motor and then reassembled it without effort.

Hopefully this has helped you restore your appliance without giving you a headache - a benefit to replacing and fixing your appliance yourself is the money you can save. Many would simply scrap their machine instead of trying to perform the repair themselves or spend the money on an outside party to replace the part. 

Luckily here at eSpares we can supply the parts and provide you with the assistance required to help you fix it yourself so you can be the hero in your home.


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